Managing Retirement Income Decisions During Retirement

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Managing retirement income has never been easy.  Those who retired in the early 1970s saw interest rates rise dramatically, then fall the same way – all within about a 15-year period.   When interest rates were going up, it made them feel good; but, few paid attention to inflation or tax implications.   During one period, interest rates were in the double-digits, but so was inflation, which meant their “increased” income wasn’t really increasing at all.    Money is worth only what it buys at the checkout counter.

So, the retiree who felt great about a 15% interest rate during 15% inflation (yes, it really happened and could happen again, blindsiding people who didn’t live through it before), weren’t really getting a raise at all – and that was before taxes!

The real problem, of course, came when interest rates began to fall.  During the period that interest rates (and inflation) dropped to 12% from 15%, retirees were seeing their incomes drop by 20% (a 3% drop in rates from 15%) while still seeing prices rise by 12%.

How do you manage income in retirement?  It ain’t easy.

Naturally, you could consider a basic withdrawal sequence using a straightforward strategy to take money in the following order:

  1. Required minimum distributions (RMDs) from IRAs, 401(k), or other qualified retirement accounts.
  2. Taxable accounts, such as brokerage and bank accounts.
  3. Tax-deferred traditional IRAs, 401(k), and other similar accounts
  4. Tax-free money – from Roth IRAs for example

This sequence can provide an order of withdrawals; but, other than the RMDs, it doesn’t tell you how much!

But wait! (as they say on tv).

How much?  And, how can you be sure you won’t run out of money?

RMD can provide a clue!

The RMD calculations can provide sound guidance for your entire portfolio!  Using the IRS formulas, Craig Iraelson, executive-in-residence in the financial planning program at Utah Valley University, did some back-testing with hypothetical portfolios invested in different investment allocations with RMD withdrawals starting in 1970 (the beginning of a relatively flat ten-year stock market).   Using beginning values, and even with a portfolio invested in 100% cash, there was still $850,000 left after 25 years!   And, a portfolio that was 25% stocks had $2 million left.

RMDs appear to address longevity risk pretty well; but, there’s another question.   Is the income level provided by the RMDs enough to preserve the pre-retirement lifestyle – or anything close?

There’s the rub.  In the back-tested portfolios, the initial RMD was 3.65% of assets… and that falls within the widely-accepted 4% rule…  but, that’s only $36,500 of pre-tax income.  Even if the retiree family has an additional $30,000 from Social Security, that’s still just $66,500 before taxes; and, for many successful individuals, that isn’t enough.

So, there’s the trade-off:  Sacrifice income for longevity, or accept longevity risk in order to take increased income.

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Maybe there’s another way.    How can a couple have more freedom to take greater income early while still addressing the risk of running out of “late-life income”?

My “Late Life Income” report shows how many couples have addressed this issue.   You can access it here!

By the way, when you get my report, you’ll also receive a subscription to my ezine.    If you decide you don’t want the ezine when you receive it, you’ll be able to unsubscribe immediately with a single click and, of course, your email is never shared with anyone.

Enjoy the report!  Hope you find it helpful.

 

Enjoy!

Jim


Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

What To Do With Business Sale Proceeds

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

 

When you receive business sale proceeds, you’ll likely pay a capital gains tax; but, that may not be the end of the story.

Suppose you have $1 million or more after the sale – money you’d like to put somewhere for future use – but you also want growth with safety and tax-deferral, too!

You could use our 401(k); however, there are funding limits in any given year and those limits don’t carry over.  Besides, the safety issue could be problematic.

Bank certificates of deposit can provide safety, but not growth or tax-deferral.

If you’re selling your business next year, you’ve waited too long to plan.  However, if your sale is scheduled for ten, fifteen, or twenty years from now, this IS the time to get your ducks lined-up – and this report might help.
Click Here!
By the way, when you get the report, you’ll also be subscribed to our free ezine.  If you decide you don’t want it, simply unsubscribe at any time – your name will be removed immediately.  IFG will never share your email address with anyone for any reason.

If you would like help, of course, we can always visit by phone.

Enjoy!

Jim


Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Old-Age Financial Security: Silence is NOT Golden, yet Some aren’t talking!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Generational planning didn’t seem important  for old age financial security in my grandparent’s day.   They were living at  a time when Social Security was passed and designed to last for a lifetime beginning at age 65.  Of course, life expectancy back then was around age 68!  Who needed to worry about generational issues?  Longevity wasn’t a risk.

My generation—the baby boomerss—became the first  to experience the ‘sandwich’ effect:  Taking care of aging parents and children at the same time.   And, as that was unfolding, people were beginning to realize they were living longer, too!

The cultural quicksand began to materialize, but few have recognized it.  It’s like glaucoma:  You don’t see it coming; but, all of a sudden, it’s there.   It’s silence.  In a recent online survey (cited below), over half of GenX respondents and 60% of baby boomers indicated they’ve never had a conversation about planning for retirement or financial security in their old age, yet their fears were the same.

The reasons tend to tell is why.  They’re repeating the same mistakes their parents made.

Why do we study history?  Because we know human nature doesn’t change—it hasn’t changed for thousands of years.  Studying history allows us to learn the mistakes human nature, unencumbered by knowledge, tends to make.  But, knowledge helps us prevent a repetition!

When parents and children don’t talk about finances, guess what…

Why do they feel they’re not making enough money?  Why do they have too many other expenses and are paying off debt?  The answer is simple.

They’re  repeating mistakes.  But, the GenX group seems to be making more of them.  Are the boomers not talking to their kids?   Are their kids not involved in their parent’s own planning?   Maybe they should be.

As parents are living longer—longevity risk– they run a very real risk of needing long-term care.  If ever there was a threat to old age financial security, this may be it; yet,  relatively few address that issue usually because of cost or for fear of losing all that money paid in premiums if they don’t use it.   However if they do need it, and the kids end up having to pay some or all of the ultimate cost for that and their parents’ support, it also could eat-up their inheritance!

What we don’t know can cause financial hurt.  Perhaps they don’t know  that a professionally-designed life insurance policy might provide tax-free money that could be used to cover long-term care if needed and yet preserves cash if it isn’t—and still maintain the children’s inheritance!   It’s a financial ‘Swiss Army Knife”  type tool that can solve a lot of issues at once.

Unfortunately, few people take the time to have a generational financial planning session either on their own or  – maybe better—facilitated with a  family financial advisor acting as a guide and facilitator.   Some advance planning can make a big difference.  Here’s an example:

Real Life Case History (Names changed)

Fred and Wilma never discussed their finances with Pebbles or Bam Bam.  As Fred and Wilma grew into their 90s, it became evident they could no longer live on their own.  Fred was diagnosed with a terminal disease and Wilma, at  90, was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s.  They could no longer function and it was now Pebbles’ and Bam Bam’s turn to take care of their parents.  Fred lived for eight more months, but Wilma continued living for nine more years.  Despite the fact they did have some retirement savings, it was no where near enough to cover the more than $600,000 in costs that were incurred  by Pebbles and Bam Bam during that 9-year period. 

Had Fred and Wilma taken the right steps sooner, those costs threatening the old age financial security of Pebbles and Bam Bam might have been covered, or—at the very least—Pebbles and Bam Bam would have been reimbursed, protecting their inheritance … and all of the money might have been provided tax-free!   Unfortunately, their attitudes about various financial solutions available to them were colored by what they’ve heard from parents, friends, and even entertainment media, including television gurus selling DVDs.   Not surprising.  Some people even get their medical advice that way.

Old strategies simply don’t address today’s longevity and ageing issues.  Different strategies are required.   How can it be possible to make sure the parents have a lifetime of inflation-adjusted income and still provide an inheritance for the kids?

Rising Inflation ScreenYou might enjoy viewing this educational 20-minute video that shows one strategy that likely makes sense for many people.  While the tools used to implement it might vary, it’s still worth a view.  So, grab some coffee and see for yourself.

If you haven’t had a generational meeting with your family financial advisor, maybe it’s time you did.  Like Mark Cuban’s dad once told him:  This is as young as you’re ever going to be.

If you would like help, of course, we can always visit by phone.

Enjoy!

Jim


Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Should You Buy Term Insurance and Invest the Difference?

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Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

 

I first heard this mantra in the 1970s.  It resurfaced again in the ’80s and again in the 90s.  Funny thing is it’s only the guru’s selling CDs and DVDs – people who are neither registered, regulated, or even have a single client – who keep promoting it.

Nevertheless, it does sound good!  Would it work.   I thought you might like to see an independent analysis that even gives term insurance a head start!  What if you could buy $500,000 of term insurance for only $1 a year!   Silly, I know, but, the analytics are interesting – and worth understanding.

I think you’ll find it interesting.  You can access it here.

Enjoy!

Jim


Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

What’s Your Focus?

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Most people buy life insurance based on the same outdated advice they’ve been given for years.   It’s predictable:  buy term – and, for many people term insurance makes the most sense!   Others have been told they should buy “whole life” because it’s permanent and comes with the most guarantees; and, for many people that probably is the best choice – and it does come with the most guarantees.

All generally agree they should buy the most amount of death benefit for the least amount of money – and in some cases, that’s true as well – but, not in all cases.

Different strategies and case designs are possible to achieve a wide variety of objectives and all can make sense for some people and not for others.    This should be no surprise.  There are people who are allergic to foods other people love – my dad, for example, couldn’t eat peanuts, but I could munch on them all afternoon.

If you’re wondering what kind of life insurance strategy makes the most sense for you, the first thing to do is to identify your focus – your priorities.  Life insurance can be simple death protection or it can function as a highly versatile financial tool accomplishing a number of objectives.

What’s your focus?  What do you want life insurance to accomplish for you?  Here’s a little tool you can use to help identify your focus; so, when you talk to an advisor (naturally I hope it’s me, but it can be anyone you trust), you’ll be able to more clearly communicate just what your needs really are.

Hope you find this helpful.
What’s Your Focus Life Insurance Priorities Tool

By the way, when you request this tool, you’ll also receive future issues of my ezine.  I hope you find that helpful, as well; but, you can unsubscribe at any time and be removed from the list immediately.

Enjoy!

Jim


Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Is Your Business A Ticking Grenade?

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Did you know that as much as 80% to 90% of many business owner’s net worth is tied-up in their businesses?

According to the Exit Planning Institute’s State of Owner Readiness survey, 83% of business owners do not have a plan for how they will leave their business.

It’s interesting when you consider the number one reason a business owner sells is to fund retirement.  The stats above are even more alarming when you consider that 70% of those doing over $1 million in revenue are 54 years old or older; and many businesses distribute all their cash flow to their owners with little in the way of cash reserves set aside.

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Businesses like these are called “lifestyle’ businesses; and many experts  agree that up to 90% of all closely-held businesses operate just this way:  They are simply operated until they shut the doors.   This being the case, it’s no wonder that 50% of all businesses end-up closing their doors unexpectedly.

When this happens, the only thing the business owner can fall back on is retirement savings, if there are any, including the business’ 401(k), which often proves insufficient simply because it’s funding limitations often can fall short of what an owner will need in retirement to preserve his/her pre-retirement lifestyle.

Many business owners intuitively understand that there business either does or should have resale value allowing them to cash-out their equity.  The problem arises, if they’ve waited too long to address this issue, is not only the ability to find a viable buyer with money, but even one that’s ‘bankable’ – one able to arrange financing outside of the selling owner; after all, no seller wants to have to come back in and retake control of a now failing business.

There are a number of solutions available to an owner who begins planning early – the earlier the better.  Just to provide one example, one solution is called the “One-Way Buy-Sell“.

It’s just one possible option among many, but you may find it interesting.  I caution, however, not to assume it’s the right solution for you.  The best solution is one that’s tailored to the business owner’s unique circumstances; but, FYI, you may enjoy learning about this one.  You can get a copy of our One-Way Buy Sell Report by using the link below:

One-Way Buy-Sell Report
Enjoy,

Jim


Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Jim’s background includes founding, building, and selling five successful businesses and international consulting.  He has been the headline speaker at more than 500 national and international association and corporate conventions for clients such as Foster Grant, Hobie Cat, CapCities/ABC, H.R. Textron, Hearst Corporation, The National Management Association, the National Newspaper Association, and Cox Communications, as well as scores of state, regional, and national conventions.  Jim has also been featured on American Airlines’ Sky Radio heard on more than 19,000 flights, as well as in The Wall Street Journal’s SmartMoney magazine, The Profit Sharing Council of America’s Insights, and has been published in the Journal of Compensation and Benefits, NASDAQ, and in scores of national and international association trade publications.

Will My Money Last?

piecing-retirement-puzzle-pathJim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Scott and Linda (not their real names) are in their 50s and have done a lot of things right:  They’ve worked hard, saved and invested, and they’ve been practical in their spending.

They feel like they’re well on-track to a secure retirement; but, a few “wild cards” do have them concerned:

  • Inflation and longevity:  They know what’s happened to their purchasing power over the last 30 years.  They’re concerned about the next 30+ (maybe 40) when they’re living off their investments.
  • Taxes:  While there may be a temporary reduction coming now, they also know the U.S. is facing a $20 trillion debt and there will be 7 or more presidential elections – not to mention 15 congressional elections – that will take place in the next 30 years.  That spells a lot of potential changes and changes in tax laws.   They want old-age income that will be protected from the politicians.
  • Health costs:  A huge wild-card.  They know the odds are about 50% one of them will need it, but they don’t want to see long-term-care insurance money going down the drain if they don’t need it.  They also want money available if they do have a chronic illness.
  • Liquidity:  They want money available for emergencies during retirement without having to jump through a ton of hoops.

I thought you might like seeing a sample case study about how one couple addressed this issue.

Enjoy!

Jim


Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Will Your Retirement Money last? Maybe – with the right ‘Late Life Income’ strategy.

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Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

This past Monday, I retweeted a Fox Business post, Why Your Retirement Savings May Be a Pipedream.

A number of my clients, deciding to help ensure their late-life income needs will be met, have  in the past elected to execute a “late life income” strategy – however, they wanted one that would not lock them in to the low rates and liquidity issues that come with annuities.

I created a hypothetical – translate fictitiousLate Life Income “case study” of what such a strategy might look like for the right candidate couple (this may not be right for everyone).  You can learn more by getting it here.

Enjoy,

Jim

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Resized CFP_Logo_GoldJim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and an Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients providing retirement planning and wealth management services since 1991. Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.6a017c332c5ecb970b01a51174cbb0970c-120wi

Tax-Advantaged is Better than Tax-Deferred! Do you know the difference?

iStock Images

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Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Tax-deferred and tax-advantaged are two terms often used interchangeably and, as a result, often lead to a lot of confusion; but, the difference can be significant in planning how you will be drawing income from your nest-egg during your retirement years.  The key, of course, is to discover your options and do advance planning.

Many employers match employee contributions up to a certain dollar amount to a company-sponsored retirement account, which usually offers tax-deferred growth.  Contributing to your account up to the employer match is a significant first step to retirement success.

However, many have found that their company-sponsored plan has proven inadequate due to contribution limits and other factors.  Most investors would likely be well served seeking out other sources of tax-advantaged retirement funds.  When used properly, tax-advantaged money is taxed up-front when earned, but not when withdrawn.  This approach may seem costly; but, that view may very well be short-sighted and far more costly.[i]

Let’s take a look at a hypothetical example of tax-deferred and tax-advantaged money at work.  Our fictitious couple, Mitch and Laura, are starting retirement this year and will need $50,000 in addition to their Social Security benefits.  Assuming a 28% state and federal tax rate, they’ll actually need to draw $69,444 from their retirement account to meet their needs.[ii]

Tax Deferred

Need = $50,000

Taxes = $19.444

Total Withdrawal required to meet spending need: $69,444

What if Mitch and Laura had balanced their portfolio with a tax-advantaged funding source?  What if they could pull the first $30,000 from the tax-advantaged source and the rest ($27,777) from the tax-deferred source?  What would that look like?

its-about-timeTax Deferred Combined with Tax Advantaged

Tax-Advantaged money = $30,000

Tax-Deferred money = $20,000

Taxes = $7,777

Total Withdrawal to meet needs and taxes = $57,777

Because Mitch and Laura balanced their portfolio, they saved $11,667 each year during retirement – almost 24% of their year’s living expenses each year!   Simple math reveals a savings of over $116,000 during ten years of retirement; and it they’re retired for 30 years, as many are, the savings is over $350,000, not counting what they could have made by leaving the money invested – which could be rather substantial:  At just 3.5% annualized, the total would come to over $600,000!

A Plan that Self-Completes

Most savings plans, including employer-sponsored retirement plans, are dependent upon someone actually continuing to work and actively contributing to the plan.   If work and contributions stop, the plan does not complete itself.    

It’s been my experience that relatively few individual investors have self-completing retirement plans, while a rather large percentage of high net-worth investors do.

What financial tool can accomplish the goal of being self-completing?  Not stocks, bonds, mutual funds, or even government-backed securities of any type.   There’s only ONE I know of – and, it’s tax-advantaged, too.   Believe it or not, it’s a “Swiss Army Knife” financial tool called life insurance.    It’s not your father’s life insurance; it’s specially designed

It can ‘self-complete’ a retirement plan – and it doesn’t matter if the individual dies early or lives a long life.  Few people realize they can win either way.    As I said, stocks, bonds, real estate, commodities, and company retirement accounts simply can’t match it; but, the design must be customized.

If you’d like to learn more about this and other smart retirement strategies, feel free to contact me.

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[i] Retirement guru Ed Slott, also a practicing CPA, is one who believes it’s very likely far more profitable to pay tax on the ‘seed’ money than on the ‘harvest.  I have created a report entitled, “How To Plan For an Income Tax-Free Retirement”.  You can request a copy at http://www.indfin.com/taxfreeretirementreport.

[ii] This has always been a source of misunderstanding for many individual investors:  The fact is not all the money in Mitch and Laura’s retirement account belongs to them.  Their retirement account might show a $500,000 balance, for example, leading them to believe they have $500,000.  The truth is less comforting.  The truth is, given a 28% tax-bracket, that $140,000 of that money belongs to the government, not Mitch and Laura.  They’ll likely never see it.  Their real balance – the one the statement doesn’t show them – is $360,000; and, as we’ve seen, they’ll need to draw-down $69,444 each year to meet their needs.  How long do you think that money will last?

 

 

Disclosures

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a fee-only registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

IS IT TIME TO RETHINK (Dump) THE 401(K)?

6a017c332c5ecb970b01a5116fb332970c-320wiMany Believe It Is…. including some well-known experts
Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

In his book, The Retirement Miracle, Patrick Kelly writes about a man who had built-up a 401(k) balance of over $2 million over his career.  Then, on the brink of retirement, his world was shattered.  It was a September day in 2008.  He’d lost about 10% of his nest-egg in a single trading day.   By October 7th, he found his balance was down to $1.5 million!  By the time he reached his last day of work, his account was down to $1.2 million – actually about $1 million less than what it had been before all this happened.

And, just as an aside,  if that wasn’t bad enough, that $1.2 million had an embedded tax liability.  If this man was in the 30% combined federal and state tax brackets, $360,000 of that belonged to the state and federal government, leaving him with only $840,000 to retire on – and THAT’s only if taxes don’t go up while he’s in retirement.

Is the 401(k) really an answer to America’s growing retirement crisis?  After all, 401(k)-type plans are a little less than 40 years old in this country, created when most people were accumulating assets.  They haven’t been around long enough to see what happens when the ‘baby-boom bubble’ begins to drain them.

More than a few experts believe it’s time to shake things up, as you’ll see in this video (there’s a very brief ad in front – it’s quick).  There’s also another video (scroll down below this one) I think you’ll find very interesting.

A recent article by Wealth Management Systems, writing for the FPA noted the following:

“Recent research indicated that a third of retirement plan participants were “not at all familiar” or “not that familiar” with the investment options offered by their employer’s plan. The study went on to reveal that individuals who were familiar with their retirement plan investments were nearly twice as likely to save 10% or more of their annual income, compared with those who report having little-to-no knowledge about such investments. Understanding your investment options is essential when building a portfolio that matches your risk tolerance and time horizon. Generally speaking, the shorter your time horizon, the more conservative you may want your investments to be, while a longer time horizon may enable you to take on slightly more risk.”

Here’s another one I think you’ll find very interesting.

The 401k Failure

How familiar with their options are 401(k) investors? Not very, apparently. Many now believe it’s time to move from a stock market-based system to something that’s insurance-based. While this may not be the right path for everyone, it certainly appears it is for most, as the following clips from FrontLine, 60-Minutes, and others.

According to The Power of Zero, by David McKnight (with a forward by Ed Slott, a CPA and well-known retirement expert, and a back cover endorsement by David Walker, former Comptroller General of the United States), an insurance-based approach makes far more sense, particularly if properly designed. And, there are a number of advantages.

The  insurance-based approach to funding retirement you saw in the video clips, does seem to have it’s benefits.

Indexed Universal Life:  A Life Insurance Retirement Plan is one 401k Alternative.
• No contribution limits
• No Pre-59-1/2 withdrawal penalties AND no mandatory distributions
• Tax Free Income at retirement
• Zero Loss From Market Crashes – with annual reset locking-in gains!
• Tax Free to heirs
• Self-funding option in case of disability
• Protection from market loss – You never lose money

It also doesn’t create taxation of Social Security benefits, provides protection from lawsuits in many states,  has no minimum age or income requirement, avoids probate, and – this is a big one – provides accurate return figures, an issue I’ve discussed in other writings.

There’s a lot more to this,of course.  If you’d like to visit with me about this, you can schedule your introductory phone call with me so I can gather some preliminary information.  Just let me know you’re interested in discussing an alternative to your 401(k).

Jim