The SECURE Act Is A Financial Planning “Game Changer”.

And, there are implications many have missed.

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Why did congress pass The SECURE Act?

Simple.  This major change will bring in $15.7 billion in tax revenue by 2029, according to the joint committee on taxation in their report on the bill, H.R. 1994.   And, guess whose money they want?   Yes, yours.

The administration, of course, is looking for ways to address the debt by raising revenue without actually talking much about the debt.  They’re even kicking the can down the road on taxes, talking about making the current tax-cuts “permanent” – as if Washington had ever passed a permanent tax bill; it’s “Washington-speak”.  The current tax law is set to “sunset”, i.e., expire in 2026, taking us all back to the pre-2017 tax rates.   Permanency would be achieved by removing the sunset date.  So far, so good; but, if you’re one of those planning for the next two decades, you should be thinking about what the next ten congressional elections might bring. 

The Stretch IRA is all but eliminated.  Under the old law, an heir could inherit an IRA and stretch the RMDs over his/her life expectancy.   Okay, considering the inheritance will probably take place during their peak earning years.   So, a $17,000 RMD on a $500,000 IRA (purely hypothetical) won’t make much difference.   However, under The SECURE Act the inheritor must liquidate the IRA by the 10th year.   There’s NO RMD REQUIREMENT, so, the heir could let the IRA grow until the last year—but, then would be required to withdraw ALL funds in one year—talk about playing roulette with what the tax laws will be when the entire balance is added to that year’s income for calculating the tax bill.   Alternatively, the heir could take a 10% yearly distribution, for example.   But, in our example, that would add $50,000 each year to taxable income during what would likely be the heir’s peak earning years!

For the owner of a traditional IRA, remember that RMDs are considered in two other areas:  (1) how much of Social Security income will be subject to taxation, and (2) as income for determining your Medicare Part B premiums.  Oh, yes, high income in retirement means higher Part B premiums.

It’s a good time, especially for those with substantial incomes, to do some planning.

Jim

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Interested in becoming an IFG client?  Why play phone tag?  Schedule your 15-minute introductory phone call!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® in his 21st year of private practice as Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a fee-only registered investment advisor with clients located in New York, Florida, and California. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742.  IFG helps specializes in crafting wealth design strategies around life goals by using a proven planning process coupled with a cost-conscious objective and non-conflicted risk management philosophy.

The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

The Stretch IRA is Gone. Now What?

There are three alternatives you can use!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

The SECURE Act has changed the game.  I discussed the things you need to know in a previous post; but maybe the biggest game-changer, especially for parents who were planning on leaving substantial nest-eggs to their kids, is the elimination of Stretch IRAs.  The big unexpected inheritor just might be Uncle Sam.

Before the SECURE Act, the child could take required minimum distributions (RMDs) based on his/her own life expectancy.  Theoretically, if they inherited early, the RMD would be so small they could actually continue growing the nest egg in perpetuity – even grandchildren could benefit!   No more.  Now, the inherited IRA has to be liquidated in ten years.

The odds are most boomers will die when their children are in their peak earning years.  So, an inherited $500,000 IRA can create some tax problems!  An inheriting child in their 50s, who before the SECURE Act may have taken RMDs in the neighborhood of $17,000, will now be required to take a first RMD of $50,000…. and that’s in addition to their income during their peak earning years.   Add to that the double-whammy that the current tax law sunsets in 2026 and the old 2017 tax brackets come back into effect, and you have a perfect storm  –  I won’t depress you with the outlook for tax legislation in view of the current national debt.

The elimination of the stretch IRA is expected to add $15.7 billion to the federal budget over the next ten years as baby boomers begin the pass away. 

As you can imagine, this has tremendous estate planning ramifications for those  wishing to pass-on wealth to their heirs.  Now that the stretch is gone, here are three you may want to consider.

  • Roth Conversions:  This is an obvious one.   Traditional IRAs may be tax-deferred, but they really should be called “tax-postponed”… until tax brackets are higher (remember the national debt and politician’s desires to spend tax dollars to gain reelection).  If state inheritance taxes are an issue, a conversion could reduce the size of the estate and reduce tax exposure, too.  A conversion may not be the right move for everyone.  There are current tax bracket shift issues that should be considered.
  • Life Insurance:  Death benefits are generally tax-free, i.e.,  not included in the beneficiary’s income.   Use distributions from the IRA to pay the policy and bingo – money goes to the kids and by-passes Uncle Sam.  Depending on age and insurability, there are even advanced designs that could provide with tax-free income during retirement, as well.   It’s not your father’s – or grandfather’s – life insurance anymore.  It has become the ‘swiss army knife’ of financial tools.
  • Charitable Remainder Trusts (CRTs):  Use your IRA to fund a CRT.  This allows parents to create an income stream for their children with part of the IRA while the rest goes to charity.  While the CRT can grow assets tax-free, the kids do pay tax on the income withdrawn.   There are two types:  an annuity trust and a remainder trust.  The first distributes a fixed annuity and doesn’t allow future contributions; the second distributes a fixed percentage of the initial assets and allows for continued contributions.

Naturally, you should discuss anything you’re considering with your financial, tax, and legal advisors before making any moves.   It pays to plan.

Jim

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Interested in becoming an IFG client?  Why play phone tag?  Schedule your 15-minute introductory phone call!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® in his 21st year of private practice as Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a fee-only registered investment advisor with clients located in New York, Florida, and California. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742.  IFG helps specializes in crafting wealth design strategies around life goals by using a proven planning process coupled with a cost-conscious objective and non-conflicted risk management philosophy.

The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Think Giving To Charity Steals From Your Heirs?

Here’s a possible solution!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Giving to charity can create significant tax advantages. Many people use real estate and securities to gain these advantages.

If you were to SELL an appreciated asset, the gain would be subject to capital gains tax. However, by donating the appreciated asset to a charity, however, you can receive an income tax deduction equal to the fair market value of the asset and pay no capital gains tax on the increased value.

Example: Alan purchased $25,000 of publicly-traded stock several years ago. That stock is now worth $100,000. If he sells the stock, he must pay capital gains tax on the $75,000 gain. However, Alan can donate the stock to a qualified charity and, in turn, receive a $100,000 charitable income tax deduction. When the charity then sells the stock, no capital gains tax is due on the appreciation.

This may create a problem, however. When Alan made this gift to charity, his family is deprived of those assets that they might otherwise have received.

Potential solution: In order to replace the value of the assets transferred to a charity, the Alan establishes a second trust – an irrevocable life insurance trust – and the trustee acquires life insurance on Alan’s life in an amount equal to the value of the charitable gift. Using the charitable deduction income tax savings and any annual cash flow from a charitable trust or charitable gift annuity, Alan makes gifts to the irrevocable life insurance trust that are then used to pay the life insurance policy premiums. At Alan’s death, the life insurance proceeds generally pass to the his heirs free of income tax and estate tax, replacing the value of the assets that were given to the charity. Not bad!

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Interested in becoming an IFG client?  Why play phone tag?  Schedule your 15-minute introductory phone call!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and An Accredited Investment Fiduciary® in his 21st year of private practice as Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a fee-only registered investment advisor with clients located in New York, Florida, and California. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742.  IFG helps specializes in crafting wealth design strategies around life goals by using a proven planning process coupled with a cost-conscious objective and non-conflicted risk management philosophy.

The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

THE MARKET IS AT ALL-TIME HIGHS! Corrections, however, are a fact of life.

For workers in their 40s and 50s facing massive government debt and retirement 15-20 years off, it’s worth asking: Is it time to (Dump) THE 401(K)?

6a017c332c5ecb970b01a5116fb332970c-320wiMany Believe It Is…. including some well-known experts
Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

In his book, The Retirement Miracle, Patrick Kelly writes about a man who had built-up a 401(k) balance of over $2 million over his career.  Then, on the brink of retirement, his world was shattered.  It was a September day in 2008.  He’d lost about 10% of his nest-egg in a single trading day.   By October 7th, he found his balance was down to $1.5 million!  By the time he reached his last day of work, his account was down to $1.2 million – actually about $1 million less than what it had been before all this happened.

And, just as an aside,  if that wasn’t bad enough, that $1.2 million had an embedded tax liability.  If this man was in the 30% combined federal and state tax brackets, $360,000 of that belonged to the state and federal government, leaving him with only $840,000 to retire on – and THAT’s only if taxes don’t go up while he’s in retirement.

Is the 401(k) really an answer to America’s growing retirement crisis?  After all, 401(k)-type plans are a little less than 40 years old in this country, created when most people were accumulating assets.  They haven’t been around long enough to see what happens when the ‘baby-boom bubble’ begins to drain them.

More than a few experts believe it’s time to shake things up, as you’ll see in this video (there’s a very brief ad in front – it’s quick).  There’s also another video (scroll down below this one) I think you’ll find very interesting.

A recent article by Wealth Management Systems, writing for the FPA noted the following:

“Recent research indicated that a third of retirement plan participants were “not at all familiar” or “not that familiar” with the investment options offered by their employer’s plan. The study went on to reveal that individuals who were familiar with their retirement plan investments were nearly twice as likely to save 10% or more of their annual income, compared with those who report having little-to-no knowledge about such investments. Understanding your investment options is essential when building a portfolio that matches your risk tolerance and time horizon. Generally speaking, the shorter your time horizon, the more conservative you may want your investments to be, while a longer time horizon may enable you to take on slightly more risk.”

Here’s another one I think you’ll find very interesting.

The 401k Failure

How familiar with their options are 401(k) investors? Not very, apparently. Many now believe it’s time to move from a stock market-based system to something that’s insurance-based. While this may not be the right path for everyone, it certainly appears it is for most, as the following clips from FrontLine, 60-Minutes, and others.

According to The Power of Zero, by David McKnight (with a forward by Ed Slott, a CPA and well-known retirement expert, and a back cover endorsement by David Walker, former Comptroller General of the United States), an insurance-based approach makes far more sense, particularly if properly designed. And, there are a number of advantages.

The  insurance-based approach to funding retirement you saw in the video clips, does seem to have it’s benefits.

Indexed Universal Life:  A Life Insurance Retirement Plan is one 401k Alternative.
• No contribution limits
• No Pre-59-1/2 withdrawal penalties AND no mandatory distributions
• Tax Free Income at retirement
• Zero Loss From Market Crashes – with annual reset locking-in gains!
• Tax Free to heirs
• Self-funding option in case of disability
• Protection from market loss – You never lose money

It also doesn’t create or increase taxation of Social Security benefits, provides protection from lawsuits in many states,  has no minimum age or income requirement, avoids probate, and – this is a big one – provides accurate return figures, an issue I’ve discussed in other writings.

Not bad.

There’s a lot more to this,of course. And, it pays to do your homework.  Talk to your advisor – or talk with me!  You can schedule your introductory phone call and begin now.

Jim

Your Insurance Company Just Went Under?

Oops. Now what? No more protection? What happened to all those premium payments? How could you have protected yourself?

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

You’ve been paying on an insurance policy for years.  Now, you’ve learned your insurance company – the one that top ratings from all the major ratings services –  just went bust – what do you do?  What could you have done to protect yourself?

There’s no counter for withdrawals and no ATM – and there’s no FDIC insurance.  So, how are you protected?

The insurance industry is regulated state-by-state.   Each state maintains its independence and operates its own system of regulation, and each is also a member of the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), which helps provide uniformity.

It’s important to understand that an insurer may be based in one state, operate in multiple states, and still be domiciled in another.  The domicile state is the lead state under normal circumstances for any regulatory actions.

While insurance companies don’t have any guaranties at the federal level, they do have state-backed insurance guaranty associations.  According to Gavin Magor, Senior Financial Analyst for Weiss Ratings and oversees their ratings process, the states have established these associations to help pay claims to policyholders of failed insurance companies. However, there are several cautions which you must be aware of with respect to this coverage:

  1. Most of the guaranty associations do not set aside funds in advance. Rather, states require contributions from other insurance companies after an insolvency occurs.

    2.There can be an unacceptably long delay before claims are paid.

  1. Each state has different levels and types of coverage, often governed by legislation. They’re unique to that state and can sometimes conflict with coverage of other states. Moreover, most state guaranty funds will not cover title, surety, credit, mortgage guarantee, or ocean marine insurance.

Bottom line: If an insurer fails, it may be awhile for you to get your claim processed and get your money to fix your home or pay bills. But just how often do insurers fail?

Since Weiss started rating insurance companies in 1989, 633 rated insurers failed. As you can see from the graph below, a majority of them were rated “D” or “E” by Weiss at the time of failure.

Image provided by Weiss

The bottom line is that you can still get your claims paid even after your insurer fails, but it might take a while. So, we recommend you check an insurer’s Weiss safety rating before you start doing business with them. With only a 0.02% chance of an insurer rated “A” or “B” failing in any one year, you can see why we favor those over insurers rated “D” or “E”. In addition to our ratings, be sure to learn more about your insurer’s state guaranty funds.

Never heard of Weiss?  I believe it.  Virtually all insurers love to tout the other better-known companies; however, there’s a problem:  Most, virtually all, of those touted rating services get paid by the insurers they rate!  Weiss’ revenue is derived from those companies that subscribe to their reporting –  it’s a business model similar to Consumer Reports which doesn’t accept advertising.  It should be no surprise that fewer companies receive Weiss’ top ratings.  It should also be no surprise that there are some ‘top rated’ companies that won’t allow Weiss to come through their doors.

I’ve encountered some insurance agents – I’ve even met some insurer’s representatives – who look at you with a blank stare when you ask about their Weiss rating.  Maybe it’s because some big household names didn’t make the cut.

Worth knowing?

Jim


Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

 

 

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and an ACCREDITED INVESTMENT FIDUCIARY® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

How Can You Manage Your Inheritance?

Here are some tips that might help!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

For most people, there are certain times when events can feel overwhelming.  For most of us, when it’s a money event (retirement plan rollover, selling property, winning the lottery, etc.) it’s usually when we think, ‘What do I do now?  I don’t want to screw this up!”

Here are some tips, along with a LifeGuide, that might help:

Take your time. This is an emotional time…not the best time to be making important financial decisions. Short of meeting any required tax or legal deadlines, don’t make hasty decisions concerning your inheritance.

Identify a team of reputable, trusted advisors (attorney, accountant, financial/insurance advisors). There are complicated tax laws and requirements related to certain inherited assets. Without accurate, reliable advice, you may find an unnecessarily large chunk of your inheritance going to pay taxes.

Park the money. Deposit any inherited money or investments in a bank or brokerage account until you’re in a position to make definitive decisions on what you want to do with your inheritance.

Understand the tax consequences of inherited assets. If your inheritance is from a spouse, there may be no estate or inheritance taxes due. Otherwise, your inheritance may be subject to federal estate tax or state inheritance tax. Income taxes are also a consideration.          

Treat inherited retirement assets with care. The tax treatment of inherited retirement assets is a complex subject. Make sure the retirement plan administrator does not send you a check for the retirement plan proceeds until you have made a distribution decision. Get sound professional financial and tax advice before taking any money from an inherited retirement plan…otherwise you may find yourself liable for paying income taxes on the entire value of the retirement account.

If you received an interest in a trust, familiarize yourself with the trust document and the terms under which you receive distributions from the trust, as well as with the trustee and trust administration fees.

Take stock. Create a financial inventory of your assets and your debts. Start with a clean slate and reassess your financial needs, objectives and goals.

Develop a financial plan. No one would begin building a home (ordering out materials and beginning construction) without a well thought out plan, blueprints, and a budget; so, why build your financial future without one? 

Long-term plans don’t change just because temporary conditions do.

Consider working with a financial advisor (preferably a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® (CFP®) professional to “test drive” various scenarios and determine how your funds should be invested to accomplish your financial goals.  Interest rates, markets, inflation, and taxes can all change.  But, your plan, if tested, is like the lighthouse in the storm – if you’re plan has been stress-tested, it’s the one thing that won’t move when everything else seems to be in turmoil.

Evaluate your insurance needs. If you inherited valuable personal property, you will probably need to increase your property and casualty coverage or purchase new coverage. If your inheritance is substantial, consider increasing your liability insurance to protect against lawsuits. Finally, evaluate whether your life insurance needs have changed as a result of your inheritance.

Review your estate plan. Your inheritance, together with your experience in managing it, may lead you to make changes in your estate plan. Your experience in receiving an inheritance may prompt you to want to do a better job of how your estate is structured and administered for the benefit of your heirs.

Don’t forget your LifeGuide!

Hope this helps,

Jim

 


Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

 

 

 

 

 

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and an ACCREDITED INVESTMENT FIDUCIARY® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

CDs, Fixed Annuities, and Indexed Annuities Share Some Common Risks- copy

This time the unnamed beneficiary gets zero.

Fotilla Images

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

The most common risk associated with all fixed-rate investments is interest rate risk.  If interest rates rise—and the fed has already sent some pretty strong signals higher rates are on the way—investors could be stuck with the old lower rates, especially  if the rate  hikes occur during the penalty period.

This may not be a huge issue with CDs most people tend to “ladder” shorter-term CDs .  Missing out on a half-point increase for six months is really an opportunity cost of 0.25%.  The bigger problem, of course, is the loss of purchasing power on an after-tax basis.

Fixed annuities tend to have surrender charges  with longer  time spans—and therefore have a larger interest rate risk exposure.   Penalty periods of five to ten years aren’t  uncommon.  Waiting several years through several potential rate increases can have a larger impact.    The longer surrender period usually does come with higher interest crediting rates, to be sure; but, it’s worth doing the math—it’s hard to get ‘sold’ on longer terms and accompanying surrender charges when the outlook for increases is unknown.  Given how long rates have been so low, a pendulum swing isn’t  hard to believe.  Remember, the insurance company’s annuity products purchased today will be backed by low-yielding bonds held today for most of the penalty period.

Fixed Indexed Annuities offer an opportunity for higher interest based on the performance of some outside index.  Despite the fact many people choose the S&P500 index as the calculation benchmark, these products are not investments in the stock market.  They are still insurance company IOUs paying a fixed rate—it’s just that the fixed rate paid each year is determined by the performance of the outside index; however,  they always come with some limiting factor—usually a ‘cap’ on the amount they’ll credit or crediting based on some sort of ‘spread’ factor.   Many professionals figure a fixed indexed annuity might actually return 1-2% more than it’s fixed-rate guarantee.   So, one that offers a fixed rate of 4% might be expected to provide a long-term return of 5-6%;  however, the return could be less.  It all depends on the performance of the external index chosen, so short-terms carry more risk than long term, if history is any indication.

Remember, too, that insurance companies can change their  crediting rates.  Nevertheless,  when you compare the expected  return of an FIA to a 5-year CD, it’s still a popular alternative, providing other factors meet with your needs.  Remember, however, longer-term products also mean longer-term  interest rate exposure, as noted above.

Premium Bonuses, too, may not be as good as they sound.  While they provide purchasing incentives, they virtually always result in lower crediting rates, further increasing interest rate risk.  It may be better to seek a shorter-term product without a bonus that allows you to move to a higher rate product sooner.  Why get stuck in a long-term contract?

Personal Take:   Generally, whatever you want to accomplish with an annuity might be better accomplished in another way, often with greater liquidity and sometimes even better benefits.  In any case, it pays to do your homework.   Just as all investments can’t be good, all annuities aren’t necessarily bad.  For many, the peace of mind knowing income is  protected is worth the trade-off.  Just remember, tax-deferred means tax postponed.  Do YOU know what tax rates will be when you plan to begin taxable withdrawals?   Neither do I.

Jim


Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

 

 

 

 

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and an ACCREDITED INVESTMENT FIDUCIARY® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

How To Disinherit Your Unnamed Beneficiary

This time the unnamed beneficiary gets zero.

              Getty Images

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

In my last post, I revealed that virtually everyone with a 402(k), IRA, or even an annuity has an unnamed beneficiary who may get the lion’s share of the money you’ve worked so hard to get.  If you haven’t read it, you can find it here.

That post showed you how you could offset that inheritance and give more money to your kids.   This post will show you how you can disinherit this unnamed beneficiary altogether – at least from the above-mentioned accounts.

I used a hypothetical example of someone who had three kids living in a high tax state like California and a $600,000 IRA.   If the kids are two-income households and successful, they could be paying 40% to the state and federal governments for the money they end-up taking from the inherited IRA.

$600,000 divided by 3 kids = $200,000 per kid.  At 40%, each kid would be paying $80,000 in taxes, realizing $120,000 after tax.   The state and federal governments would therefore receive $80,000 x 3 kids = $240,000  –  this would be DOUBLE what each kid would end-up with!

What if you could disinherit the government altogether?

You guessed it:  There’s only ONE tool I’ve found that can do this, if combined with the right strategy.

In my last post, I talked about using a life insurance policy and the children using the tax-free death benefit to pay the taxes, keeping their IRA inheritance in-tact.  This time we do it differently.

Starting with the same $600,000 IRA, we purchase a $600,000 survivorship life insurance policy (it pays after the last of two spouses dies).  This time, however, instead of using the death benefit to pay the taxes, the death benefit goes to the children tax-free. 

The strategy: 

  1. Name a tax-exempt charity as beneficiary of your IRA.
  2. Purchase a life insurance policy for full estimated IRA value (we’ll use $600,000).
  3. At death, the charity receives the IRA proceeds tax-free.
  4. Your kids receive the $600,000 ($200,000 each) tax-free.
  5. The state and federal governments get zero.

Your kids received $80,000 more than the $120,000 they would have received, a 70% increase using our hypothetical tax bracket – that’s $240,000 went to them instead of the government, who got nothing.

How much did the life insurance cost?   That depends on the policy and the company, but I think it’s less than $240,000, ya think?

Jim


Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

 

 

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and an ACCREDITED INVESTMENT FIDUCIARY® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Your IRA Has An Unnamed Beneficiary!

And, this one could end-up with the lion’s share of all you worked for.

Fotilla Images

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

It’s one thing if you forget to name someone as a beneficiary – you have three kids and forgot to name one of them (oops!) – but, it’s even worse when someone you didn’t even name may end-up with the lion’s share of your retirement account!

Can’t happen?  Oh yes, it can.

Let’s assume you have a 401(k) or IRA valued at $600 000.   Who would you like to inherit it?  Chances are it’s your loved ones/kids.   So, why haven’t you given it to them already?  Simple:  You may need the money.   But, when you do pass away, your beneficiaries must include withdrawals in their taxable income.   It’s not uncommon for retirees to die sometime between ages 75 and 95… this is often the time the IRA passes to the next generation at or near their peak values.

Leaving timing and amounts aside, if you live in a high-tax state like California, the combination of other taxable income and withdrawals can easily put someone in a higher tax bracket.

Will assume the IRA is $600,000 and you have three successful kids.  It wouldn’t be unrealistic for a successful two-income family to end-up in a combined state and federal tax bracket of 40%

Here’s what each will end-up with:   $200,000 (1/3 of the IRA) less $80,000 (40% state and federal taxes) = $120,000.

Oh, yeah… your 4th kid:  Uncle Sam.   He received $80,000 x 3 kids = $240,000.  That’s THREE TIMES what each of your kids received!

Happy now?

How do we keep that extra $240,000 in your three kid’s pockets? You can use a tax-offset strategy.  It’s simple:  You transfer the risk.   Now, this isn’t something you can do with stocks, bonds, gold, or real estate.  There’s only one tool in the financial toolbox I know of that can do this.  

The strategy:  You purchase a $600,000 survivorship life insurance policy.  When the parents die, the children inherit the IRA.   They also each inherit 1/3 of the life insurance proceeds ($200,000) which, by the way, comes tax-free.  They can use the death benefit proceeds to pay the taxes they owe for inheriting the IRA.  They keep the entire IRA (each is now $80,000 richer) and your family has retained an additional $240,000.

Each received $200,000 instead of $120,000.   That’s a 70% increase!

They also now have choices.  Because taxes aren’t an issue, they could liquidate the IRA and invest the money where they’ll have complete liquidity and no future required minimum distributions or explore other options available to them.

Either way, they’re better off.   Thanks, mom and dad.


Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and an ACCREDITED INVESTMENT FIDUCIARY® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.

Ageing Issues Make Financial Planning More Important than Ever!

Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

When I was a  kid, no one I knew had Alzheimer’s.  Heck, no one my parents knew had it.  In fact, I don’t think anyone even knew what it was!

There may have been a few special-needs children around, but I never saw one in either elementary or high school.   Attention deficit disorder (A.D.D.)?  Never heard the term.

What a difference a generation of changes make:  changes  in health care advances as well as in people’s lifestyles.  People are living longer – that’s a good thing; but new challenges face us all.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s is now the 6th leading  cause of death in the U.S.  Between 2000 and 2016, deaths from heart disease actually declined by 11%; but deaths from Alzheimer’s increased 123%!

5.7 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s today.  One in three seniors dies with Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia.  16.1 million Americans are providing 18.4 billion hours of unpaid care for loved ones suffering from Alzheimer’s and dementia.  It’s not covered by Medicare, and all those politicians who want to “reform” health care are  amazingly silent about solving this problem.

Virtually every family I know has been touched by Alzheimer’s (including my own) or special needs issues affecting children or grandchildren (again, including my own).

Many ‘baby-boomer’s’ have become known as the ‘sandwich’ generation – taking care of both parents and children or even grandchildren, due to the combination of increased longevity coupled with these new medical challenges families are facing.

It’s never been more important to have a long-term multi-generational financial plan in-place.   Many parents, for example, don’t realize that may have created plans for their special-needs child’s financial security that will actually disqualify the child’s eligibility for government benefits in the future… and that their plan needs to preserve that eligibility while seeing that the child will be secure all the way through the child’s own retirement.  Who pays the rent and utilities when the child is older and the parents are gone?  Where  does the child  live?  Who pays the rent or mortgage.. or property and other taxes?   How about transportation – for life?

Indeed, the challenges today are greater than  ever before because the issues are different.  When should a person begin planning?  Now.  It doesn’t  matter your age.  Do it now.

It’s not about being an investment guru; it’s about having a strategy tied  to a plan – and arranging assets to accomplish long-term objectives.

Do it now.   Okay, I’ll shut up.

Jim


Jim Lorenzen, CFP®, AIF®

Jim Lorenzen is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER® professional and an ACCREDITED INVESTMENT FIDUCIARY® serving private clients since 1991.   Jim is Founding Principal of The Independent Financial Group, a  registered investment advisor with clients located across the U.S.. He is also licensed for insurance as an independent agent under California license 0C00742. The Independent Financial Group does not provide legal or tax advice and nothing contained herein should be construed as securities or investment advice, nor an opinion regarding the appropriateness of any investment to the individual reader. The general information provided should not be acted upon without obtaining specific legal, tax, and investment advice from an appropriate licensed professional.